Dublin’s ‘tent city’: 55 asylum seekers set up camp along the Grand Canal hours after tents were removed

40 tents remain up just hours after the operation to clear the banks of homeless asylum seekers.The tents are set up on a small patch of grass a few hundred meters from where they were before.Eamon Ryan denies migrant camp dismantled ahead of Europa League final in AvivaThe government has said it wants to move asylum seekers out of tents and into modular or prefabricated housing for the winter.Up to 30,000 asylum seekers are expected to arrive in the State this year, as around 600 arrive each week.

Around 40 tents remain in place along Dublin’s Grand Canal after 89 male asylum seekers, sleeping rough at the same location, were moved this morning.

The asylum seekers who stayed were not offered accommodation and returned to pitch their tents on a small patch of grass a few hundred meters beyond where they were before.

This afternoon, more men were heading to bed for the night.

Migrant tents at the Grand Canal lock in Wilton Terrace this afternoon (Image credit: Frank McGrath)

Barricades were erected along the canal to prevent new tents from going up. However, Olivia Headon, a volunteer who has been helping those seeking international protection, said only a fraction of the people were offered accommodation this morning and remain near the site.

She told RTÉ’s Drivetime: “We have a lot of men who are still in the canal in a very small green space that has not yet been barricaded, who will possibly sleep there tonight.

“There was a lot of anxiety on the men’s part. They didn’t fully understand what was happening. I think always in the back of people’s minds is, ‘Is this deportation? Are they taking us to the airport?'”

40 tents are erected on a site on the banks of Dublin’s Grand Canal (Photo: Adrianna Wrona)

“We don’t need to have this massive multi-agency operation every time that costs thousands; it can be done in a more humane and dignified way, it doesn’t always have to be this urgent removal,” he added.

There were tense scenes at lunchtime when several men appeared on the canal and began shouting abuse at those gathered. A woman’s attempts to calm the situation were met with more racist insults.

Previously, when efforts to clear the area began, there was widespread bewilderment and confusion among asylum seekers.

Some of the men had received an email from the IPO advising them to go to Dundrum Central Mental Hospital for accommodation.

The email advised that “the number 44 bus will take you to Dundrum or alternatively you can take the Luas green line.” Many of the men do not speak English and did not know where they should go.

Migrant tents at the Grand Canal lock on Wilton Terrace/Mespil Road (Photo: Frank McGrath)

Using a translation app on a smartphone, a man in Jordan said he didn’t know if he had received an email because he doesn’t know how to read. He said he had been sleeping on the bank of the canal for a week.

Another man, Brian Mogotsi, said he had arrived in Ireland in January and had not received any offers of accommodation since. He had fled South Africa to seek asylum in Ireland for fear of his life.

“Every day that passes I get more and more desperate,” he said. “I’m here alone and this can really affect a person. Honestly, I don’t know how long I can keep going like this.”

Migrants photographed in camp along the Grand Canal Photo: Gerry Mooney

Ibrahim Nasir, from Ethiopia, said he had been sleeping on the bank of the canal since last Wednesday.

“I went to the IPO and then I came here,” he said. “I spent four days without a tent. I slept on the floor. I haven’t slept for three days. I didn’t eat, I can’t sleep or live anywhere. I came with two friends. I don’t know where I’ll go. “I have nowhere to go and no one I know here.”

Another asylum seeker from Afghanistan said he had been sleeping in a tent next to the Grand Canal for two months.

“They don’t let me work. If they give me permission tomorrow I’ll be working. “I just want to have a home,” he told Irish independent.

This morning’s clearance was the fourth time asylum seekers sleeping in tents have been moved from parts of Dublin city in recent months – twice to Mount Street and twice to the Grand Canal.

The government hopes to move asylum seekers out of winter tents and into modular or prefabricated housing.

A Green Party spokesman said the Government wants to remove asylum seekers in tents at sites such as Crooksling before winter.

The Coalition is studying “several” other sites where migrant camps will be established and “everything is being evaluated.”

The spokesperson said the use of tents is “short-term.” Previously, migrants were also housed in tents in Stradbally, Co Laois.

However, he declined to give an indication of a time frame, saying the situation is “complex” and delicate.

“It’s a very challenging situation,” he said.

“I’m not going to set myself on a certain date. They work at high speed, they work 24 hours a day.

“We have never had the levels of migration that we have seen in the last two years.”

The Government expects that up to 30,000 asylum seekers will arrive in the State this year, since around 600 people arrive every week in search of international protection.

The State is currently studying the possibility of using part of Thornton Hall, in north County Dublin, to house asylum seekers in military-style tents.

The site is expected to be ready within four to six weeks.

Earlier, Transport Minister Eamon Ryan denied that homeless asylum seekers would be moved ahead of the Europa League final at the Aviva Stadium tomorrow night.

The Green Party leader said they were moved because accommodation was available and not because of the final between Atalanta and Bayer Leverkusen.

Mr Ryan told RTE News at one: “That is not the reason why you would look for accommodation for people, but for a football match.

“It is a constant reality that we have to provide protection to people who seek refuge here. That has been a real challenge because of the numbers that have been arriving.

“We didn’t have accommodation available, but as soon as it’s available we clearly want to provide it to those who are in a more dangerous situation and who are camped that way, so that’s the reason it was done now: it’s because we have the accommodation available.”

Ryan acknowledged that “it could never be stopped if someone wanted to set up a tent in a certain location” but said ministers want to stop makeshift camps for safety reasons.

Early this morning, almost two weeks after the previous attempt to clear the camp in the capital, a multi-agency operation began removing tents set up by asylum seekers who had been sleeping rough along the canal.

Gardaí, Waterways Ireland staff, the HSE and doctors from the charity Safetynet are taking part.

Several beds have become available in recent days, so on Tuesday 89 applicants for international protection were offered places in specially designed accommodation.

Some of the men received an email from the International Protection Office advising them to go to Dundrum Central Mental Hospital before 10am to arrange accommodation.

They were advised to take the number 44 bus or the green Luas line.

An operation to remove tents on Dublin’s Grand Canal. Photo: Stephen Collins/Collins Photos

However, there are still several tents in the canal and the remaining asylum seekers have not yet been housed. Many of the men do not speak English and did not know where they should go.

Using a translation app on a smartphone, a man in Jordan said he didn’t know if he had received an email because he doesn’t know how to read. He said he had been sleeping rough along the canal bank for a week.

Another man, Brian Mogotsi, said he had arrived in Ireland in January and had not received any offers of accommodation since. He had fled South Africa to seek asylum in Ireland for fear of his life.

“Every day that passes I get more and more desperate,” he said.

“I’m here alone and this can really affect a person. I honestly don’t know how long I can keep going like this.”

The latest migrant camp on Dublin’s Grand Canal had grown to more than 100 tents two weeks after a similar camp was dismantled.

Today’s news in 90 seconds – May 21, 2024

The new camp began to grow between Baggot Street Bridge and Wilton Place on the city center canal side within days of the removal of a camp of around 100 tents on Mount Street Bridge on May 9.

The removal from the Mount Street Bridge site came just over a week after an expanded encampment of more than 200 asylum seekers was dismantled on May 1 from Mount Street, Grattan Street and surrounding side streets and alleys, which It had been around for over a year.

Asylum seekers at the time were taken off-site to accommodation in Crooksling and Citywest after local residents and businesses in the Mount Street area threatened legal action.

In a statement this morning, the Department of Integration said: “International Protection Accommodation Services (Ipas) continues to work to ensure that the limited bed space available to International Protection applicants is prioritized for those most in need, including those who “They are considered sleeping badly.”

Last week, Taoiseach Simon Harris defended the government’s action on the growing problem of migrant camps, saying he believed “official Ireland turned a blind eye to the development of what became almost a public health emergency.” , in relation to the camp on Mount Street. Lower.

He added that it is necessary to very quickly identify state-owned land to provide sanitation services to the tents.

“It is extremely important. We have obligations in relation to accommodation and we will fulfill them.

“But it’s just one part of a broader conversation that needs to take place about what a sustainable immigration system should look like,” Harris said last week.